The Vikings

General discussions regarding DNA and its uses in genealogy research

Posts: 2154
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 12:11 am
http://www.history.com/news/globetrotti ... of-ireland

"Haywood says Ireland’s decentralized system of governance, which made the island appear vulnerable to a larger force, actually had the opposite effect in protecting it from a Viking takeover. He points out the the centralized kingdoms of early medieval Europe were the most easily conquered since there was a much smaller ruling class to either eliminate or negotiate with to forge a lasting peace agreement. With so many kings to subdue and bargain with in Ireland, it proved much more difficult to eliminate or co-opt the existing power brokers.

In many ways one of the most fascinating aspects of the Irish is how this apparently highly divided island proved much more effective at combating the Vikings than England did,” Haywood tells HISTORY. “In Ireland you could kill a king, but it doesn’t really disable the kingdom because there are an infinite number of successors. Also, with all these Irish kingdoms, you can’t negotiate a permanent peace with anybody. In England in the 9th century, by contrast, most of the kingdoms are quite centralized and succession to the throne is confined to a small group of people. So if you can knock out a royal family, it’s leaderless and you can take over."

Posts: 2154
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 8:42 am
https://www.siliconrepublic.com/innovat ... -genealogy

"Irish people have much more Viking DNA than we once thought"

http://journals.plos.org/plosgenetics/a ... en.1007152
Abstract
"Previous studies of the genetic landscape of Ireland have suggested homogeneity, with population substructure undetectable using single-marker methods. Here we have harnessed the haplotype-based method fineSTRUCTURE in an Irish genome-wide SNP dataset, identifying 23 discrete genetic clusters which segregate with geographical provenance. Cluster diversity is pronounced in the west of Ireland but reduced in the east where older structure has been eroded by historical migrations. Accordingly, when populations from the neighbouring island of Britain are included, a west-east cline of Celtic-British ancestry is revealed along with a particularly striking correlation between haplotypes and geography across both islands. A strong relationship is revealed between subsets of Northern Irish and Scottish populations, where discordant genetic and geographic affinities reflect major migrations in recent centuries. Additionally, Irish genetic proximity of all Scottish samples likely reflects older strata of communication across the narrowest inter-island crossing. Using GLOBETROTTER we detected Irish admixture signals from Britain and Europe and estimated dates for events consistent with the historical migrations of the Norse-Vikings, the Anglo-Normans and the British Plantations. The influence of the former is greater than previously estimated from Y chromosome haplotypes. In all, we paint a new picture of the genetic landscape of Ireland, revealing structure which should be considered in the design of studies examining rare genetic variation and its association with traits."

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