H7


Posts: 65
Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2012 6:55 pm
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 10:26 pm
Andbro, I think you can upload your 23 mtDNA results to www.mtDNACommunity.org for a more complete analysis, but I'm not sure since it's sponsored by FTDNA; I uploaded my results directly from my mtDNA page at FTDNA.
mtDNA H7* (Cerda, Sicily)
yDNA J-Z2324/PF4843 (Villavallelonga, Abruzzo, Italy)
aDNA ~55% European, 45% Middle Eastern

Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 8:15 pm
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:51 am
Hi

I tested at FTDNA. Mtdnacomunity puts me h1.

Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:37 pm

YDNA:
I2a1b1a
MtDNA:
H7g
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:42 pm
Hello I am H7 on ftdna but mtdnacom lists me as H7g. My oldest maternal grandmother was from Hungry, however I have no ftdna matches from Hungry. I do have a few matches from Galicia, Poland. All Jewish.
User avatar
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: Dunham, Québec, Canada
YDNA:
R1b1-Z150/S257
MtDNA:
H7*
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:45 pm
eviladam wrote:Hello I am H7 on ftdna but mtdnacom lists me as H7g. My oldest maternal grandmother was from Hungry, however I have no ftdna matches from Hungry. I do have a few matches from Galicia, Poland. All Jewish.


The only H7g haplotype that I know at GenBank is reproduced at

http://cerbere.ca/wconnect/wc.dll?Nesto ... ership~H7g

AccesNumber: JQ703479 H7g
A263G 309.1C 315.1C A750G A1438G A4769G A4793G A7472T A8860G A15326G T16519C

If your haplotype does not perfectly concord with JQ703479, please consider having it registered at GenBank.


Being *all Jewish* does not imply that the readers of this chronicle could not be related to you, at least not to the point of not listing your known matrilineage. For instance, it is known that some of my ancestors were once Jewish before becoming good Christians and later fine Atheists. Some of my pagan or Christian ancestors also converted to the Jewish religion and may still have descendants today identifying as Jewish. After all H7 existed some 20,000 years ago, much before the the founding of the three major monotheist religions. The last word should be left to mtDNA together with documentary genealogy. Culture and Religion are not genetically transmissible. Don't you agree?
Jacques BEAUGRAND

French Heritage DNA project http://www.frenchdna.org
Beaugrand-Champagne project http://www.beaugrand.ca
H7 mt Genome group http://www.H7mt.org

R-U152 > L2 > Z49 > Z142 > Z150 > (familial L553+)
H7*

Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:37 pm

YDNA:
I2a1b1a
MtDNA:
H7g
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2012 12:15 am
While I do agree that Culture and Religion are not "genetic" I have to disagree with you and your seperation of them for geneological reasons. I never meant that the fact that my Jewish ancestors were not capable in being related to any of the other people in this post for H7 or any other haplogroup for that matter since they all lead back to Africa anyway....

Noting, recording, and following cultures and religions is extremely important to human history and is a main motivation for human migration in the last few thousand years and probably beyond that as well along with climate changes. Even in your own recent history your family ended up in Canada from Europe for several reasons. I know for a fact that some of my family left the Basque region of Spain in 1526 for Mexico, where they would be left alone. Now if you look at the history of Spain and France the Basque people were treated rather poorly throughout history, why? Well because they spoke a different language, ate different food, and praticed thier religions differently. So to get away from persecution they beat feet and headed for a New World. Now obviously this is only one example of the dispora of a group of people but it only shows how these important motivators effect human migration and while the distance is much greater than say Ukraine to Germany it is still the same thing, and has been happening for a very long time.

I write this because my late Father-in law was a New Mexico Geneologist that literally rewrote the genological history of the Territory, which had HUGE ramifications on the religious and cultural beliefs of the people that live here still today. My Father-in law found many discrepancies in the geneologic paperwork because people "chose" ancestor to be related to... why? Because as good Roman Catholics/Protestants they did not want to "believe" they were decended from Jews or Germans or whatever. Genetics came into play to only further that certain people once thought to be relatives were infact not and pointed to different people that were not as desirable. Now I do not believe that every where is like New Mexico geneology... But I do think that this form of fabrication of family trees is wrong on many levels as you lose your ancestral identity and probably more prevalent than most think.

If you take all that out and just look at genetics then whats the point? We eventually all go back to Africa and have somewhere between 2-4% neaderthal in there too. And 20k years for the age of H7? Id like to see the oldest skeletal remains that was pulled from as genetic dating is too controversial to hold as fact in my opinion. My profession is Anthropology and I specialize in MesoAmerica, but by know means do I claim to know everything. To find an actual "homeland" we need alot more ancient remains to test or where our haplogroup originated is just pure conjecture.
User avatar
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: Dunham, Québec, Canada
YDNA:
R1b1-Z150/S257
MtDNA:
H7*
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:34 am
According to Roostalu et al. (2006) the age of H7 in Europe would be of 16,100 with a standard deviation of 7,400 years. Thus 87.5% of H7 would be estimated to be between 9,600 and 23,500 years old. H7 from the Near East would be on the average about 2,000 younger. Their paper can be obtained at http://cerbere.ca/public/Roostalu2006.pdf

I have posted the same information at http://www.facebook.com/H7haplogroup

According to Behar et al (2012) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.03.002 the age of hg H7 was estimated to be 8891 +/- 1685 years (Table S5).

But this is the age of dispersion.
H7 surely existed before 10,000 ya BP.
I admit having recalled the date given by Roostalu. That given by Behar was too fresh.

Nonetheless, did the Hebrew people already existed at that time ?

Best regards
Jacques Beaugrand


---
Behar et al. (2012) A “Copernican” Reassessment of the Human Mitochondrial DNA Tree from its Root. The American Journal of Human Genetics, Volume 90, Issue 4, 675-684, 6 April 2012.

Roostalu et al. (2006)
Origin and Expansion of Haplogroup H, the Dominant Human Mitochondrial
DNA Lineage in West Eurasia: The Near Eastern and Caucasian Perspective
Mol. Biol. Evol. 24(2):436–448. 2007
Jacques BEAUGRAND

French Heritage DNA project http://www.frenchdna.org
Beaugrand-Champagne project http://www.beaugrand.ca
H7 mt Genome group http://www.H7mt.org

R-U152 > L2 > Z49 > Z142 > Z150 > (familial L553+)
H7*
User avatar
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: Dunham, Québec, Canada
YDNA:
R1b1-Z150/S257
MtDNA:
H7*
PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2012 3:30 am
A new version of the mtDNA phylogenetic classification (Build 15) has been posted at PhyloTree.org last week.
The H7 section remains unchanged.
Jacques BEAUGRAND

French Heritage DNA project http://www.frenchdna.org
Beaugrand-Champagne project http://www.beaugrand.ca
H7 mt Genome group http://www.H7mt.org

R-U152 > L2 > Z49 > Z142 > Z150 > (familial L553+)
H7*
User avatar
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: Dunham, Québec, Canada
YDNA:
R1b1-Z150/S257
MtDNA:
H7*
PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2012 3:49 am
Here is a figure which shows where H7 persons that were tested at FTDNA or at 23andMe indicated the country of origin of their most remotely known matriarch. Other point are suggested by research results from well known scientific publications.
The representation is indicative only. It is not proportional to results and does not depict the reality of H7 in the population. These results are also surely biased by the fact that people from Western Europe and North America proportionately get tested much more frequently than people of other countries.
Nonetheless, it has the merit to show that H7 is very broadly distributed but not densely distributed as some isocline maps seem to usually show.
Although H7 does not represent a high percentage of the whole H complex (between 3 and 5%), it is found in many countries of the Mediterranean basin.
H7 is found in Mauritania (Sub-Saharan Africa).
In North Africa : Algeria, Tunisia especially among Berber nomads, in Libya and Egypt, in the Dubai population, in Israel, Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, among Druzes sharing these countries, in Turkey, Georgia, among Armenians, in Uzbekistan, Sicily, Middle and Northern Italy, and in much of the rest of Europe including the Basque country and Northern Spain.
It has been reported among Romas (Tsiganes), and Romanians. Norway also shows quite a high number of H7 cases in the scientific literature.

If you are aware of the presence of H7 cases elsewhere, I will update this map to represent them accordingly. Please mention the source where this information was published.




Image
Jacques BEAUGRAND

French Heritage DNA project http://www.frenchdna.org
Beaugrand-Champagne project http://www.beaugrand.ca
H7 mt Genome group http://www.H7mt.org

R-U152 > L2 > Z49 > Z142 > Z150 > (familial L553+)
H7*
User avatar
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: Dunham, Québec, Canada
YDNA:
R1b1-Z150/S257
MtDNA:
H7*
PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2012 5:01 am
I have been *appointed* administrator of the H7mtgenome project at FTDNA.
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/mtdna_h7/

whith its result section at
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/mtdna_h7/default.aspx?section=mtresults|H7-mtDNA%20Test%20Results

I have also created a website at http://www.H7mt.org pointing to the above and to other databases on Cerbere, a small server in my laboratory at Dunham.

I think that the decline of interest for the use of DNA to validate genealogies together with documentary research has gradually come from the fact that mtDNA projects do not post the most remotely known ancestress, do no post the matrilineages of the tested person and do not post the variations in the CR, as if this region included very private information.
The idea that the CR could reveal health predispositions was greatly exaggerated is not justified anymore.

Since at FTDNA only results of their clients can be posted there, I have decided to start an independent H7 mtDNA project which will combine H7 results from various testing companies (23andme, Ancestry, FTDNA, Gene2, &c) with a clear purpose of facilitating true genealogy.

I have nothing against the study of the phylogeny of mtDNA and doing cladistics in order to understand our ancestry. This is what I call doing ancestronomy. It is a topic extremely interesting but ontologically not belonging to the same level as genealogy.

As in our initial project, mtDNA can still serve genealogy when information concerning the matrilineage of the tested person is made available, and that variations found in the CR region is also made available to assure that matches are genuine ones and not only apparent.

Thus, all H7 persons interested in using mtDNA to find relatives (which is called doing *genealogy*) and to validate the line of mothers part of their genealogy and to conciliate their documentary research (yes it is possible), please send me :

(1) your mtDNA results (=CRS variations and haplogroup+subclade), or the summary given by James Lick utility (haplogroup, CRS mutations); the haplogroup belonging will be verified.

(2) your ID number at 23andMe or at FTDNA/iGenea, or Ancestry and a valid Email address; only the ID (or Kit number) will be shown; the Email will be used by the database to forward you messages from other members but this Email will not be available publicly to other members;

(3) the list of couples part of your line of mothers (date and place of marriage, names of spouses); this is necessary for other genealogists to find and to document their connection with you. Here is an example of matrilineage in the H7 database http://bit.ly/TG5blP

If you have not carried out this documentary research yet, please take one hour to complete it, taking note of the names of spouses, their date and place of marriage and respective fathers and mothers, &c.

(4) a statement authorizing me to record and store this information in a database that can be interrogated on line at http://cerbere.ca/wconnect/wc.dll?Nestor~dropHgmt~H7mtgenome~membership
or at http://bit.ly/TG6ukM

The database will only reveal (a) your kit number at 23andme/FTDNA/else; (b) your haplogroup according to PhyloTree.org; (c) the list of CRS variations typed /detected in your mtDNA; (d) your list of mothers (and their husbands) for genealogical purposes.

In sharing this information publicly it will become possible to do genealogy, even with the information revealed by your testing at 23andme, or FTDNA, or Ancestry ...

For further information, do not hesitate to contact me at Jacques(at)FrenchDNA.org
Jacques BEAUGRAND

French Heritage DNA project http://www.frenchdna.org
Beaugrand-Champagne project http://www.beaugrand.ca
H7 mt Genome group http://www.H7mt.org

R-U152 > L2 > Z49 > Z142 > Z150 > (familial L553+)
H7*

Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2013 4:28 pm

MtDNA:
H7b2
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:27 pm
Hello,

I tested with the Genographic Project 2.0 and my mtDNA was reported as H7b2. I transferred my data to the FTDNA database, but no matches are available. I haven't done any other DNA tests at this time, I'm highly considering it, should I get some money to play with in the future.

I've been trying to find information about H7b2, but there is literally nothing on the internet about it. I'm a university student, so I even tried searching the journal database in the library, but no hits there either. I have found a few papers briefly mentioning H7 which have been enlightening, and this thread here of course has also been a little treasure trove of information.

I'm completely new to genetics and genealogy, so please pardon my ignorance. I'm seriously trying to learn, and very enthused about researching and piecing together my family's origins.

If anyone can tell me about H7b2, or point me in the direction of where I might learn about it, I would be so very, very appreciative. :)
PreviousNext

Return to Haplogroup H (mtDNA)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest