great grandfather was adopted

DNA testing for adoptees. Success Stories. Discussions.

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Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 10:52 pm

YDNA:
R1b1a2a1a1b
MtDNA:
U5
PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2012 9:36 pm
Who would need to be tested for an autosomal test and will that help to possibly find out what surname would have been his paternal parent?

Posts: 623
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 2:16 pm
PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2012 10:12 pm
If you're looking for the surname of your great-grandfather's father, I think your best chance is a 67-marker Y-DNA test on someone along that same patrilineal line. With some luck, you will be a close match to a bunch of men with the same surname.
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Posts: 134
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 10:23 pm
Location: Western Colorado
YDNA:
J-L147.1 J1c3d L1253
MtDNA:
H
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 12:39 am
lgmayka wrote:If you're looking for the surname of your great-grandfather's father, I think your best chance is a 67-marker Y-DNA test on someone along that same patrilineal line. With some luck, you will be a close match to a bunch of men with the same surname.


I agree and would also do a deep clade test. I am adopted and and have done just about all the tests [111Marker & FF] I can; with the Walk thru the Y being done now. The more tests... the clearer pictuer you come up with.
Y J1c3d P58+ L147.1+ L222- 174- Z644- Z640- Z644- +L1252 +L1253 L1279- Z1884+ CTS5857-
FTDNA N42042
Oldest Y ancestor:
Archebald Graham, father of David b. Dec. 23, 1647 in Edinburgh, Scotland
Oldest Mt: My mother's grandmother on her Mother's side: Sonicooie b +- 1743 CNE [Cherokee Nation East]was father to Soniovie [Susannah] Sonicooie
My mother's grandmother on her father's side was 1/2 Creek Indian from Alabama
User avatar
Posts: 134
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 10:23 pm
Location: Western Colorado
YDNA:
J-L147.1 J1c3d L1253
MtDNA:
H
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 3:36 am
Gato wrote:
lgmayka wrote:If you're looking for the surname of your great-grandfather's father, I think your best chance is a 67-marker Y-DNA test on someone along that same patrilineal line. With some luck, you will be a close match to a bunch of men with the same surname.


I agree and would also do a deep clade test. I am adopted and and have done just about all the tests [111Marker & FF] I can; with the Walk thru the Y being done now. The more tests... the clearer pictuer you come up with.

One more thing: Join all the FTDNA groups that your testing tell you that you are kin to and contact close DNA cousins. If nothing else you will meet some interesting folks.
Y J1c3d P58+ L147.1+ L222- 174- Z644- Z640- Z644- +L1252 +L1253 L1279- Z1884+ CTS5857-
FTDNA N42042
Oldest Y ancestor:
Archebald Graham, father of David b. Dec. 23, 1647 in Edinburgh, Scotland
Oldest Mt: My mother's grandmother on her Mother's side: Sonicooie b +- 1743 CNE [Cherokee Nation East]was father to Soniovie [Susannah] Sonicooie
My mother's grandmother on her father's side was 1/2 Creek Indian from Alabama
User avatar
Posts: 202
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 5:38 am

YDNA:
R-L21+, L226+
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 5:10 am
Moonlightflower wrote:Who would need to be tested for an autosomal test and will that help to possibly find out what surname would have been his paternal parent?


If you are primarily interested in this one adoption, a Y-STR test at 67 markers would be your best bet. Your results could come back with a rare set of Y-STR values which is dominated by one surname or you could have common Y-STR marker values and would have numerous choices for possible ancestors. If you have common markers and too many matches, a lot of Y-SNP testing would be next. You should wait to see how FTDNA predicts your Y-SNP (haplogroup) first. Upload your Y-STR markers to Y-Search or join a haplogroup project so others can easily see your Y-STR and Y-SNP values and give you guidance after more genetic information is available.

For NPEs (such as your adoption), you are trying to find common mutations between submissions as well as raw genetic distance. You will need to thoroughly test you Y-SNPs and hopefully test positive for a recent SNP. Once you discover your most SNP, compare the MRCA of the Y-SNP to the MRCA of your genetic cluster. Mutations between these two will be key to narrow down any list of possible NPE connections (if you somewhat common Y-STR values). 10 to 20 percent have rare or somewhat rare Y-STRs and 15 or 20 % have very common Y-STR values. These rest are somewhere in between.

I have discovered four solid NPE connections in my surname projects - it takes a lot of analysis but is possible to make serious progress. My brick wall on my mothers (Brooks) line now appears to be a NPE of a Wade line in the mid 1700s. Would have never figured that out without DNA. Had another out of wedlock birth in the 1850s that was close to some Brooks submissions - later found an extremely good match to the same surname that her sister married. Another was a surprise NPE - where the submission did not match any of the lines for his surname. His Y-STRs were so rare that it tied him to my Casey cluster. This explained why his line had economic connections to my Casey lines in the 1830s. The biggest NPE discovery to my surprise was for my Casey cluster - there was a big gap between my Casey cluster and another Casey cluster that probably shared a common ancestor 600 to 800 years ago - with a huge gap in between clusters. Then we discovered a Kersey match with ties in Oxford, England in the early 1600s. Apparently our Irish line started in Ireland - moved to England where they changed their name to Kersey to avoid discrimination. They then moved to South Carolina in the mid 1700s and many started using Casey again while others did not.

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