Slaves as Wedding/ Birthday Presents?

Forum for discussions on genealogy in general.
User avatar
Posts: 223
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 12:23 am

YDNA:
R1b-L48-Z2
MtDNA:
L1c1d(C8657T,16224C)
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 4:06 pm
Well, my third great grandmother still does not have a Christian name to my knowledge . . . but with the many genetic tests I have taken . . . some creative guessing seems to be needed.

There is no record of a Christian name given to my third great grandmother. Her genetic signature suggests her family was from Virginia, and earlier, her family was from Cameroon in Africa. Her mt-DNA is unique, and it has been studied by me since 2004-5. A.J. Adkins of Alabama was the father and slave master of her child Tina (born 1831) who became a house slave of JW Adkins of Tennessee.

Laura Ann Winston was the daughter of Elizabeth Jones and JW Winston who married on 16 Jan 1817. She married Thomas Rogers on 22 Feb 1841. JW Adkins’ wife was Emily Rogers the sister of Thomas Rogers who married on 15 Nov 1832. Elizabeth Jones had first been married to Thomas Adkins on 17 Oct 1811. They had two sons before Thomas passed away around 1815. One was named William. JW Adkins is thought to be this William Adkins. After Elizabeth’s death in 1841, the families moved to Grimes, Texas taking Tina Adkins with them. JW Winston died in Sumter Co. Alabama a year earlier. Based upon birth records, they reach Texas before or around 1845. Grimes County was created in 1846 from a portion of Montgomery County. The county was named for Jesse Grimes; one of Stephen F. Austin's Colonists. Emily passed away at the age of 32 on 29 Jul 1850 which is about the same time Tina begins to have her eight quadroon children. The men of the families did not join the Confederate Calvary until the Yankee Army invaded New Orleans. Tina’s last child, Roxie, had a different father named Alexander Terrell. Tina and her eldest daughter, Rhonda, worked as a laundress for their "white" neighbors, including Dr. David C. Dickson on Dickson's Hill.

Well, that is my updated guess based upon feedback and my records and reading . . .

Princess of England; Sister of King Stephen
30th great grandmother
Emma De Blois

Charlemagne de Francie
40th great grandfather

. . . I just wonder about all this DNA testing. Let me see, 2^20 is one in a million, but it is only twenty people to look at for me, and so it is interesting to examine how the mostly paternal lineage developed throughout the years its own history, 2^10 is about one in a thousand and 2^30 is about 1 in a billion and so on . . .
User avatar
Posts: 223
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 12:23 am

YDNA:
R1b-L48-Z2
MtDNA:
L1c1d(C8657T,16224C)
PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 1:53 am
Well, the results are in from Ancestry.com DNA

3 matches with my 6th Great Grandfather from my family tree with High Confidence aDNA match, Ancestry DNA
1 match with my 7th Great Grandmother from my family tree with Good Confidence aDNA match, Ancestry DNA
One secret match from my family tree with Good Confidence aDNA match, Ancestry DNA

Paper trail most likely confirmed with high confidence through aDNA
User avatar
Posts: 223
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 12:23 am

YDNA:
R1b-L48-Z2
MtDNA:
L1c1d(C8657T,16224C)
PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 1:44 am
Before 1645, the Occaneechi trail led to an American Indian fishing dam at the Appomattox River. The Virginian Native Americans had a complex travel system using rivers all over the eastern coast. Colonist Thomas Pitt obtained the land around the Falls of the Appomattox, and Fort Henry was built to protect settlers and prevent the Indians from fishing in this fishing village area. A smaller Fort Henry was built here in 1610 by Thomas Gates as a part of a series of fortifications. By 1645, the House of Burgesses decided to build the larger Fort Henry. In 1646, it was used as a treaty frontier following the Second Anglo-Powhatan War. This was the only point where Indians could be authorized to cross eastward into Colonist territory and Colonist could be authorized to cross westward into Native American territory. The treaty lasted from 1646 until 1691, Bacon's Rebellion era. General Abraham Wood became Fort Henry's first commander, and he sent out several expeditions from there (At least four exploratory parties departed and returned to Fort Henry between 1650 and 1674 after documenting the geography and Indian tribes to the south and southwest of this frontier outpost). The Fort gained popularity as Fort Wood. Several things happened, and my 8th great grandmother, Margaret Wood, married my 8th great grandfather, Major Peter Jones. There were other social things and relationships happening here when the General Assembly passed an act calling for Major Peter Jones (March 7, 1675) to retake control of Fort Henry (birth dates confuse me sometimes). The area became a fur trading post with "Peter's Point" (Peter Jones Trading Station, Peter Jones Trading Post, and Old Stone Lumberhouse) becoming a popular area stop over, a supply and administrative depot. A family friend, Colonel William Byrd II (British colonial gentry who married Lucy Parke, Maria Taylor) of Westover, helped to establish Petersburg (1733) in 1748 becoming incorporated as a town in 1784. The development of the area was aided by John Bolling, the great-grandson of John Rolfe and Pocahontas, who built a tobacco warehouse on the peninsula known as the Pocahontas Island neighborhood.

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