Fernàndez, Zilhao or Gioiello ?

Any discussions regarding mt-DNA markers, results or questions.

Posts: 2348
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 7:08 am
Location: Pisa (Italy)
YDNA:
R- Z2110 (KV7Y2)
MtDNA:
K1a1b1e/HQ176413
PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2014 3:28 am
"It was not possible to retrieve autosomal STRs from the Bom Santo population (Palomo et al. 2011), a strong
limitation that prevents a more complete palaeogenetic picture from being obtained. However, mitochondrial DNA
results are relatively unexpected and point to far-reaching possibilities. Indeed, the nine individuals showed eight different
haplogroups—U5b, T2b, J, HV0, H10e, K1a2a1, H18 and U5a1 (Table 6.3)—, which means a very diversified population
in its maternal lineages. J is the only repeated haplogroup. Comparisons with other Iberian Mesolithic and Neolithic
cemeteries allow some preliminary conclusions to be drawn regarding how population changed through time in Southern
Portugal.
̇ Work by Fernández et al. (n.d.) on the Mesolithic shell-middens of the Tagus and Sado river valleys (Portugal)
and elsewhere in Spain, Sánchez-Quinto et al. (2012) on the La Braña Cave double burial in León, and
Hervella et al. (2012) on the Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic of Cantabria and Navarre Spanish provinces
point to a rather homogeneous genetic pool in the Pre-Neolithic populations of Iberia. Indeed, all results
consistently indicate a high frequency of HV and U haplogroups. U-derived haplogroups, U5 sub-branches in
particular, are very relevant since these are also very well represented among the Mesolithic populations of
central Europe and Scandinavia (Bramanti et al. 2009; Mälmstrom et al. 2009) and seem to form a major
feature of the genetic landscape of the last European hunter-gatherers (Brandt et al. 2013). Haplogroup J,
traditionally linked to the Neolithic expansion (Richards et al. 2000; Lacan et al. 2011a, 2011b; Brandt et al.
2013), has also been found in one Mesolithic individual from the Portuguese shell-middens, thus indicating a
probable Mesolithic ancestry of this mitotype in the country. Thus, Bom Santo’s individuals #01 and #14
(haplogroups U5b and U5a1, respectively), as well as individual #06 (haplogroup HV0), #02 (haplogroup
T2b), #04 and #10 (haplogroup J) and maybe also #12 (haplogroup H1) may represent genetic continuity
from the last hunter-gatherer groups of Portugal. At the megalithic tomb of Prissé-La-Charrière (West-
Central France), dated to the second half of the 5th millennium BC, U5b haplogroup was also found in one
individual, suggesting to the authors of the study a similar explanation in spite of the time length comprised
between both cultural periods (Deguilloux et al. 2011). It is worth mentioning that the important Mesolithic
Muge sites are located only c. 40 km east of Bom Santo Cave, a fact that reinforces such an idea of genetic
continuity.

According to the available genetic dataset, the introduction in Iberia of the farming economies originated in
the Near East parallels the introduction of new mitochondrial haplogroups. Specifically, this is the case of
several branches of major haplogroups K, N*, and X1. This panorama is especially evident at sites with larger
samples analysed: Can Sadurní in Catalonia (Gamba et al. 2012), Los Cascajos and Paternanbidea in Navarre
(Hervella et al. 2012). While the presence of some “Mesolithic haplogroups” in these sites indicates some
degree of genetic continuity, haplogroups with no recorded precedents may point to migration events.
Following archaeological models, a Near Eastern origin is thus favoured, a possibility in good accord with
available aDNA datasets from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic settlements in Syria (Fernández 2005; Fernández et
al. 2006). Therefore, the ancestry of Bom Santo’s individual #09 (haplogroup K1a2a1) derives from a very
well circumscribed historical process: the maritime colonization of the peninsula by Mediterranean farmers
during the 6th millennium BC. ( Carvalho et al (2014) Bom Santo Cave (Lisbon) and the Middle Neolithic Societies of Southern Portugal https://www.academia.edu/7044639/Bom...thern_Portugal p . 222)

I answered the papers of Fernàndez in my thread "Dead women from Middle East" and Fernàndez et al. wrote the recent paper where they would have demonstrated that HV0b is Sephardic in Iberia I spoke about in another thread.
Mediterranean farmers as for Zilhao came from Italy. That before they came from Middle East is to demonstrate yet.

Posts: 2348
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 7:08 am
Location: Pisa (Italy)
YDNA:
R- Z2110 (KV7Y2)
MtDNA:
K1a1b1e/HQ176413
PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2014 9:41 am
Gioiello wrote: While the presence of some “Mesolithic haplogroups” in these sites indicates some
degree of genetic continuity, haplogroups with no recorded precedents may point to migration events.
Following archaeological models, a Near Eastern origin is thus favoured, a possibility in good accord with
available aDNA datasets from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic settlements in Syria (Fernández 2005; Fernández et
al. 2006). Therefore, the ancestry of Bom Santo’s individual #09 (haplogroup K1a2a1) derives from a very
well circumscribed historical process: the maritime colonization of the peninsula by Mediterranean farmers
during the 6th millennium BC.


That K1a2 is of Middle Eastern origin isn't a demonstrated assumption. The haplogroup is fundamentally European and the Jewish Ashkenazic sample finds in two Italians its closest ones with the mutation A8725G. As many other times demonstrated very likely is the other way around:
2. EF660927(Italy) Gasparre K1a2 04-JUL-2007
A73G A263G 315.1C C497T A750G T1189C A1438G A1811G A2706G A3480G A4769G C7028T A8725G A8860G G9055A T9698C A10398G A10550G T11025C T11299C A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A C14167T C14766T T14798C A15326G T16224C T16311C A16399G T16519C
3. HM065508 FTDNA K1a2 21-APR-2010
A73G A263G 315.1C C497T A750G T1189C A1438G A1811G A2706G A3480G A4769G C7028T A8725G A8860G G9055A T9698C A10398G A10550G T11025C T11299C A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A C14167T C14766T T14798C A15326G T16224C T16311C A16399G T16519C
6. KC878713(Ashkenazi) Costa K1a2 27-SEP-2013
A73G A263G 309.1C 315.1C C497T A750G T1189C A1438G A1811G A2706G A3480G A4769G C7028T A8725G A8860G G9055A T9698C A10398G A10550G T11025C T11299C A11467G G11719A A12308G G12372A T13617C A13827G G13928C C14167T C14766T T14798C A15326G T16224C T16311C T16519C

On SMGF there are 43 matches of K1a2a1, all Europeans.
This is the way many scholars write their papers.

Posts: 2348
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 7:08 am
Location: Pisa (Italy)
YDNA:
R- Z2110 (KV7Y2)
MtDNA:
K1a1b1e/HQ176413
PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2014 10:58 am
Curious people may give a glance to these samples from Mitosearch.
Benveniste (UNNGM) are Italian Jews:


User ID HVR1 Mutations HVR2 Mutations
YKBS6 224C, 311C, 399G, 519C Not Tested
UNNGM 168T, 224C, 311C, 399G, 519C 073G, 263G, 315.1C, 497T
WDTNK 224C, 311C, 399G, 519C 073G, 263G, 315.1C, 497T
WRMMK 224C, 311C, 399G, 519C No Mutations
XFHSA 224C, 311C, 399G, 519C 073G, 263G, 315.1C, 497T

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