New DNA Papers

General discussions regarding DNA and its uses in genealogy research

Posts: 2173
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 9:43 pm
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/25/scie ... srael.html

"Scientists on Thursday announced the discovery of a fossilized human jawbone in a collapsed cave in Israel that they said is between 177,000 and 194,000 years old.

If confirmed, the find may rewrite the early migration story of our species, pushing back by about 50,000 years the time that Homo sapiens first ventured out of Africa.

Previous discoveries in Israel had convinced some anthropologists that modern humans began leaving Africa between 90,000 and 120,000 years ago. But the recently dated jawbone is unraveling that narrative.

“This would be the earliest modern human anyone has found outside of Africa, ever,” said John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist from the University of Wisconsin, Madison who was not involved in the study."

Posts: 2173
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 12:44 pm
Article | OPEN

The genetic prehistory of the Baltic Sea region
Alissa Mittnik, Chuan-Chao Wang, Saskia Pfrengle, Mantas Daubaras, Gunita Zariņa, Fredrik Hallgren, Raili Allmäe, Valery Khartanovich, Vyacheslav Moiseyev, Mari Tõrv, Anja Furtwängler, Aida Andrades Valtueña, Michal Feldman, Christos Economou, Markku Oinonen, Andrejs Vasks, Elena Balanovska, David Reich, Rimantas Jankauskas, Wolfgang Haak, Stephan Schiffels & Johannes Krause

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-02825-9

Abstract
"While the series of events that shaped the transition between foraging societies and food producers are well described for Central and Southern Europe, genetic evidence from Northern Europe surrounding the Baltic Sea is still sparse. Here, we report genome-wide DNA data from 38 ancient North Europeans ranging from ~9500 to 2200 years before present. Our analysis provides genetic evidence that hunter-gatherers settled Scandinavia via two routes. We reveal that the first Scandinavian farmers derive their ancestry from Anatolia 1000 years earlier than previously demonstrated. The range of Mesolithic Western hunter-gatherers extended to the east of the Baltic Sea, where these populations persisted without gene-flow from Central European farmers during the Early and Middle Neolithic. The arrival of steppe pastoralists in the Late Neolithic introduced a major shift in economy and mediated the spread of a new ancestry associated with the Corded Ware Complex in Northern Europe."

Posts: 2349
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 7:08 am
Location: Pisa (Italy)
YDNA:
R- Z2110 (KV7Y2)
MtDNA:
K1a1b1e/HQ176413
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 8:53 pm
Some moron on "Eurogenes blog" said that there is an R1b1a2... but it is 2500/2800 years old, thus no meaning about the origin of our haplogroup. Before only R1a. I am waiting tha Genetiker tests the two older R1. Curious to see their haplogroup. I think some hunter-gatherer from Western Europe.

Posts: 2349
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 7:08 am
Location: Pisa (Italy)
YDNA:
R- Z2110 (KV7Y2)
MtDNA:
K1a1b1e/HQ176413
PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 1:23 pm
Gioiello wrote:Some moron on "Eurogenes blog" said that there is an R1b1a2... but it is 2500/2800 years old, thus no meaning about the origin of our haplogroup. Before only R1a. I am waiting tha Genetiker tests the two older R1. Curious to see their haplogroup. I think some hunter-gatherer from Western Europe.


Sample Country Culture Date BC Haplogroup
Popovo 2 Russia Mesolithic 7500–5000 J1~L255

Donkalnis 4 Lithuania Mesolithic 6000–5740 I(xI1)

Donkalnis 7 Lithuania Narva 5460–4940 R1b1a1a1~M73

Kivisaare 3 Estonia Narva 4730–4540 R1b1a1a~P297

Kretuonas 5 Lithuania Narva 4450–4340 I2a1b~Y3104(xI2a1b2)

Tamula 3 Estonia Comb Ceramic 3800–3640 R1b1a~L754

Turlojiske 5 Lithuania Bronze Age 2100–600 R1a1a1b~Z645

Kivutkalns 153 Latvia Bronze Age 800–545 R1a1a1b1a3-YP1370

Posts: 2173
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 6:38 pm
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10. ... 17.1409801

Reconstructing the genetic history of Italians: new insights from a male (Y-chromosome) perspective
Viola Grugni, Alessandro Raveane, Francesca Mattioli, Vincenza Battaglia, Cinzia Sala, Daniela Toniolo Divisione di Genetica e Biologia Cellulare, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano, Italy;
View further author information
, show all
Pages 44-56 | Received 31 Jul 2017, Accepted 20 Nov 2017, Published online: 30 Jan 2018

Posts: 2173
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:10 am
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/02/18/267443

Population Replacement in Early Neolithic Britain
Selina Brace, Yoan Diekmann, Thomas J. Booth, Zuzana Faltyskova, Nadin Rohland, Swapan Mallick, Matthew Ferry, Megan Michel, Jonas Oppenheimer, Nasreen Broomandkhoshbacht, Kristin Stewardson, Susan Walsh, Manfred Kayser, Rick Schulting, Oliver E Craig, Alison Sheridan, Mike Parker Pearson, Chris Stringer, David Reich, Mark G Thomas, Ian Barnes
doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/267443

Abstract
"The roles of migration, admixture and acculturation in the European transition to farming have been debated for over 100 years. Genome-wide ancient DNA studies indicate predominantly Anatolian ancestry for continental Neolithic farmers, but also variable admixture with local Mesolithic hunter-gatherers. Neolithic cultures first appear in Britain c. 6000 years ago (kBP), a millennium after they appear in adjacent areas of northwestern continental Europe. However, the pattern and process of the British Neolithic transition remains unclear. We assembled genome-wide data from six Mesolithic and 67 Neolithic individuals found in Britain, dating from 10.5-4.5 kBP, a dataset that includes 22 newly reported individuals and the first genomic data from British Mesolithic hunter-gatherers. Our analyses reveals persistent genetic affinities between Mesolithic British and Western European hunter-gatherers over a period spanning Britain's separation from continental Europe. We find overwhelming support for agriculture being introduced by incoming continental farmers, with small and geographically structured levels of additional hunter-gatherer introgression. We find genetic affinity between British and Iberian Neolithic populations indicating that British Neolithic people derived much of their ancestry from Anatolian farmers who originally followed the Mediterranean route of dispersal and likely entered Britain from northwestern mainland Europe."

Posts: 2173
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 9:18 am
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43115485

"But towards the end of the Neolithic, about 4,450 years ago, a new way of life spread to Britain from Europe. People began burying their dead with stylised bell-shaped pots, copper daggers, arrowheads, stone wrist guards and distinctive perforated buttons.

Co-author Dr Carles Lalueza-Fox, from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE) in Barcelona, Spain, said the Beaker traditions probably started "as a kind of fashion" in Iberia after 5,000 years ago.

From here, the culture spread very fast by word of mouth to Central Europe. After it was adopted by people in Central Europe, it exploded in every direction - but through the movement of people."


"Whatever did happen, Prof Parker Pearson is doubtful about the possibility of a violent invasion. The Beakers, he said, were "moving in very small groups or individually".

He explained: "This is no great horde, jumping in boats en masse... it's a very long, slow process of migration." Furthermore, the incidence of interpersonal violence appears to be higher in Neolithic Britain (7%) than it was in the Beaker period (1%)"

Posts: 2173
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2018 12:23 pm
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-018-0508-4

The resilience of postglacial hunter-gatherers to abrupt climate change
Simon Blockley, Ian Candy, Ian Matthews, Pete Langdon, Cath Langdon, Adrian Palmer, Paul Lincoln, Ashley Abrook, Barry Taylor, Chantal Conneller, Alex Bayliss, Alison MacLeod, Laura Deeprose, Chris Darvill, Rebecca Kearney, Nancy Beavan, Richard Staff, Michael Bamforth, Maisie Taylor & Nicky Milner

Abstract
"Understanding the resilience of early societies to climate change is an essential part of exploring the environmental sensitivity of human populations. There is significant interest in the role of abrupt climate events as a driver of early Holocene human activity, but there are very few well-dated records directly compared with local climate archives. Here, we present evidence from the internationally important Mesolithic site of Star Carr showing occupation during the early Holocene, which is directly compared with a high-resolution palaeoclimate record from neighbouring lake beds. We show that—once established—there was intensive human activity at the site for several hundred years when the community was subject to multiple, severe, abrupt climate events that impacted air temperatures, the landscape and the ecosystem of the region. However, these results show that occupation and activity at the site persisted regardless of the environmental stresses experienced by this society. The Star Carr population displayed a high level of resilience to climate change, suggesting that postglacial populations were not necessarily held hostage to the flickering switch of climate change. Instead, we show that local, intrinsic changes in the wetland environment were more significant in determining human activity than the large-scale abrupt early Holocene climate events."

Posts: 2173
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:53 pm
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-bri ... tZdW4jwZ9M

Over 100 New Hair Color Genes Help Untangle A Confusing Trait

"In this way, they picked out 124 genes, including one on the X chromosome, related to hair color. Of these, only 13 had been found before, they say, in research published Monday in Nature Genetics. The study couldn’t really say how each gene influenced hair color, but, given the number of genes involved, it’s certainly complex. One thing’s for sure: While hair color is almost entirely inherited — as previous studies in twins have shown — we still have only a limited ability to predict what someone’s hair color will be."

One of the hair colour SNPs in the pdf from the science paper shows rs1426654 as a hair colour variant which is a variant associated with skin colour.

https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1426654

My view is that Cheddar man may have had the same skin colour as modern Iberians because he was U5 and had one copy of the red hair gene that is found in Iberians.

Posts: 2173
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:43 pm

MtDNA:
U5b2b
PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 5:42 am
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv ... 7.full.pdf


"Another important observation is that all later individuals in the steppe region, starting 604 with Yamnaya, deviate from the EHG-CHG admixture cline towards European 605 populations in the West. This documents that these individuals had received 606 Anatolian farmer-related ancestry, as documented by quantitative tests and recently 607 also shown for two Yamnaya individuals from Ukraine (Ozera) and one from 608 Bulgaria24. For the North Caucasus region, this genetic contribution could have 609 occurred through immediate contact with groups in the Caucasus or further south. An 610 alternative source, explaining the increase in WHG-related ancestry, would be contact 611 with contemporaneous Chalcolithic/EBA farming groups at the western periphery of 612 the Yamnaya culture distribution area, such as Globular Amphora and Tripolye 613 (Cucuteni–Trypillia) individuals from Ukraine, which also have been shown to carry 614 Anatolian Neolithic farmer-derived ancestry24. 615 616 Archaeological arguments would be consonant with both scenarios. Contact between 617 early Yamnaya and late Maykop groups at the end of the 4th millennium BCE is 618 suggested by impulses seen in early Yamnaya complexes. A western sphere of 619 interaction is evident from striking resemblances of imagery inside burial chambers of 620 Central Europe and the Caucasus56 (Supplementary Fig. 9), and particular similarities 621 also exist in geometric decoration patterns in stone cist graves in the Northern Pontic 622 steppe57, on stone stelae in the Caucasus58, and on pottery of the Eastern Globular 623 Amphora Culture, which links the eastern fringe of the Carpathians and the Baltic 624 Sea56. This implies an overlap of symbols with a communication and interaction 625 network that formed during the late 4th millennium BCE and operated across the 626 Black Sea area involving the Caucasus59, 60, and later also involved early Globular 627 Amphora groups in the Carpathians and east/central Europe61. The role of early 628 Yamnaya groups within this network is still unclear57. However, this interaction zone 629 pre-dates any direct influence of Yamnaya groups in Europe or the succeeding 630 formation of the Corded Ware62, 63 and its persistence opens the possibility of subtle 631 bidirectional gene-flow, several centuries before the massive range expansions of 632 pastoralist groups that reached Central Europe in the mid-3rd millennium BCE19"
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