Examples of adoptions / NPE (older events)

DNA testing for adoptees. Success Stories. Discussions.

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R-L21+, L226+
PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 4:17 pm
I think that determining NPE events (adoptions, etc.) is a hidden jewel of Y-DNA testing. As a admin for the Casey and Brooks surname projects, here are three examples of how older NPE events were determined (these are still somewhat speculative):

1) Hanvey submission matching very unique Casey DNA fingerprint. I am very fortunate to have several unique Y-STR markers in my genetic cluster where the fingerprint associated with this genetic cluster is unique enough that almost anybody that has this unique fingerprint probably belongs to this Casey genetic cluster. This cluster now has around 20 67 marker submissions is slowing growing and revealing a lot of genealogical branches that was not formerly known. I was approached by the Hanvey sponsor who suggested that he suspected that his Hanvey may be a Casey adoption. So how does one build a case for this connection ? First, the Y-STR fingerprint is so unique that only Casey submissions match except the one Hanvey submission. Second, this Casey cluster all has ties to western South Carolina from 1760s to 1830s. The Hanvey line lived in the same two or three counties where the Casey cluster resided. This means there was a chance for a NPE based on geography. Third, traditional genealogical sources showed probate records where Caseys were economically involved with the Hanveys. This happened just prior to most of the Caseys leaving the area around 1830.

2) Genealogical connections to Wade surname in my Brooks family and best genetic matches between my Brooks genetic cluster primarily matches only Wade submissions. There has always been one major issue connecting my oldest proven Brooks ancestor to his father. The two oldest sons were not included in extensive probate records, however, the father signed the marriage surety bond for one son and the other son signed a marriage bond for a suspected sister. Both speculated sons were definitely listed in the same household via personal property tax lists. Almost all children moved from Virginia to the same county in South Carolina. Numerous other documents imply genealogical connections to the two speculated sons to his father. Then Y-DNA was added to the picture. Previously, there were genealogical connections between the Wade and Brooks family. The speculated father and his wife named a son Wade Brooks. Undocumented family history states that the speculated father married Brambly Wade. Numerous legal documents confirm her first name was
Brambly. Then all Y-DNA matches match only Wade submissions and do not match any other Brooks lines. Further research show that both the Wade and Brooks families migrated together three times throughout Virginia for the ancestors of the speculated father. Speculative conclusion - their appears to be strong evidence that Brambly may have been previously married to a Wade, then re-married the speculated father of my Brooks ancestor. The two oldest sons may have been born with Wade DNA and later adopted into the Brooks family. Unfortunately, little genealogical information is known about the other two sons - but lots of information on many daughters. So DNA of the other two sons can not be tested since no descendants have been documented to date.

3) There was a known Butler out of wedlock birth in the 1850s and the Y-DNA matched a Brooks line (not mine). This Butler joined the Brooks surname project hoping to find a missing Brooks connection. However, upon closer inspection, there were Bradberry submissions that matched even better to Butler submission. With a little genealogical research, we found that another genetically related Bradberry DNA submission married the sister of the out of wedlock Butler mother and the Bradberry family was found only a few families away in the 1860 census. There is now strong genetic / genealogical evidence linking the Butler NPE to the Bradberry line. This is a major breakthrough for the Butler NPE and their researchers are now researching the Bradberry for possible connections. It may be very difficult to prove which Bradberry was responsible for the NPE - but have it narrowed down to one Bradberry family that resided near the Butler line.

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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 5:44 pm
I too have a DNA link to the Wade surname..but I seem to be descendant of the Kipling surname (yes THAT one), and apparently very recently. I also have some secondary, coincidental family events, linking this tie.
It is more than a surprise..the strange thing is that, perhaps through my extensive research, that I feel a closer link to my surname ancestors than to the Kipling. Perhaps this is similar to the link qdoptees feel to the adoptive family, even after finding genetic parents.
I would think that many more people shall find surprises like this.
I once posted something on a DNA link to the Parisi of Yorkshire. Their capitol was Petruaria, modern day Brough. My Kipling link originates in Brough.

Sort of, the more things change, the more they stay the same....
Rich
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4jdg5, mtdna v,
PF4363 match to Hap I in Sardinia
Clarkson ,Kipling, Parker
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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 11:18 pm
Britanicus wrote:I too have a DNA link to the Wade surname..but I seem to be descendant of the Kipling surname (yes THAT one), and apparently very recently. I also have some secondary, coincidental family events, linking this tie. It is more than a surprise..the strange thing is that, perhaps through my extensive research, that I feel a closer link to my surname ancestors than to the Kipling. Perhaps this is similar to the link adoptees feel to the adoptive family, even after finding genetic parents. I would think that many more people shall find surprises like this.
Rich


I published a 400 page book on my Brooks family in 1982 and have since doubled the scope of the book. Yet my new possible Wade NPE connection is hard to get enthusiastic about after years of researching my Brooks line and Brooks is my mother's maiden name. My Wade/Brooks NPE connection was probably Lunenburg County, VA in the 1760s. I also had speculative Brooks connection where I compiled several hundred descendants from 1780 to 1880 - I miss that line that was proven not related by DNA. It really destroyed the other line's ancestry chart as well - so they do not like DNA too much. I got more excited about helping the unrelated Butler NPE. We actually determined the family that was the father of the NPE - but DNA will be extremely difficult to prove which son in the family it was (or a visiting cousin for that matter). The Hanvey sponsor published a 800 page book on his line and his Casey NPE has made him gun shy about publishing this DNA discovery as it would upset a lot of people in the book to find out they are not really Hanveys. Even good researchers can miss an adoption since they were usually so informal in 1700s and 1800s. Hey - but just because you find new information that does not match what you want, it is a step in the right direction for accuracy.

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